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Cleaning up your old excess Docker containers

05 Aug

Every docker run command creates a container on your system. When you exit the container (and it is no longer running) it is still there on disk and can be seen with

docker ps -a
CONTAINER ID IMAGE COMMAND CREATED STATUS PORTS NAMES
ea520a35da1f jvzoggel/kafka "/bin/bash" 2 minutes ago Exited (0) 2 minutes ago kafka1
46067fe01dc4 jvzoggel/kafka "/bin/bash" 3 minutes ago Exited (0) 2 minutes ago kafka2
0b7bcb382e65 jvzoggel/kafka "/bin/bash" 3 minutes ago Exited (0) 3 minutes ago kafka3

The containers that are not running will not consume any system resources except disk space, but it is usually good to clean up after yourself so ..

Automatically clean-up after yourself

The Docker documentation describes how to automatically clean up the container and remove the file system when the container exits:
   –rm=false: Automatically remove the container when it exits (incompatible with -d)
The above shows that by default containers are not removed, so by adding –rm=true or just the short-hand –rm will do the trick:

docker run -i -t --rm jvzoggel/kafka /bin/bash

When you exit from the container it will be automatically removed from disc.

Manually clean-up your stuff

Another method (all credits: Guillaume J. Charmes) is the command:

docker rm `docker ps --no-trunc -aq`

which will remove all containers in a elegant way

 

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Posted by on 05-08-2016 in Uncategorized

 

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